Business Law

BLAW 201. Business Law I — (3 units)
Prerequisite: General Education requirements or permission of instructor.
Introduces two of the most important legal concepts a business person must know to be successful in today's litigious business environment. Students will gain a detailed understanding of the law of Torts and Contracts.

BLAW 301. Business Law II — (3 units)
Prerequisite: BLAW 201 Business Law I.
Covers three very important legal concepts a business person must know to be successful in today's litigious business environment. Students will gain a detailed understanding of the law of agency, partnerships, and corporations.

BLAW 315. Employment Law — (3 units)
Prerequisite: None.
Explores the legal considerations that occur when an employer-employee relationship is established. Covers labor law, discrimination, equal pay and comparable worth, occupational safety and health, worker's compensation, disability law, and employment privacy issues. Focuses on permissible activities in handling personnel problems, and emphasizes preventive law.

BLAW 320. Environmental Law — (3 units)
Prerequisite: None
Covers the extensive environmental laws that affect virtually every business, especially air pollution, water pollution, waste disposal and the regulation of chemicals.

BLAW 420. Law of Sales Contracts (Uniform Commercial Code) — (3 units)
Prerequisite: BLAW 201-Business Law I; BLAW 301 Business Law II
This course covers the laws pertaining to the sales of goods, including the formation, terms and performance of sales contracts; remedies for breach of sales contracts and products liability. It also includes negotiable instruments, creditors rights and bankruptcy, personal and real property, insurance, wills, trusts, elder law and professional liability and accountability.

BLAW 425. Intellectual Property and Cyberlaw — (3 units)
Prerequisites: BLAW 201-Business Law I; some previous coursework related to law
An advanced course investigating the distinct applications of law in cyberspace. The course will cover a variety of topics, including intellectual property rights, civil and criminal jurisdiction, and free speech issues. Focuses on the challenges posed by the internet to traditional notions of regulation, federal and local control, and jurisdiction over individuals and corporations. Students should emerge from the course with a grasp of the practical and the theoretical difficulties in applying traditional structures to cyberspace, and a keen sense of the current state of development.